Tag Archives: Serengeti

Fabulous Trip to Africa, 22 Sep to 4 Oct 2015, Post 6 – Serengeti

Out into the cold and dark…   Breakfast was early as predicted. We finally got on the road at 7:30, and made our way out to where the game were. That’s a bit of a bad way of saying it, as game are all around us here. We pass through zebra, giraffe, and several kinds of antelope before we get very far.

But first I should comment on our lodgings. This is a tent place. All the buildings, of which there are about 15 are tents. 20150928-DSC_2403The main tent is about twice as large as the cabin tents, giving it room for a nice lounge on one side and dining tables on the other. There are chandeliers hanging from the ceiling providing light, and electricity for most of your needs. This is provided by sun power, which collects the electricity in batteries during the day, and then allows use at night. There is a generator which kicks in if the batteries get low. As with each of these individual-tent-cabin places in the middle of wild animals, one of the camp’s employees (ours is Sampson) accompanies you whenever you go out in the dark.  By the way, the curtain behind Gwen hides the bathroom facilities, so we didn’t have to go outside to relieve ourselves.

Our room cabin tent is very large, probably 40 feet by 24 feet, with a full stand-up bathroom at one end. The room centers around the double bed, enshrouded with netting to keep away the mosquitoes at night. The other aspect of living in a tent in the Serengeti are the noises in the night. Lots of animals sound off (we really couldn’t tell what we were listening to), and then there is the wind, which was loud last night.

So on to today. Each day seems to get better, and today was no exception.

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Vervet monkeys

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Zebra fight!

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Momma and baby Kongoni

Momma and baby Kongoni

Momma and baby

Momma and baby

The savannah in the Serengeti seems dryer than what we saw in Amboseli or in Ngorongoro.  I guess there is enough to eat, but our guide tells us that the rains have been sparse so far, so the fields are not as supportive of the large herds are they have been in the past.  Still we see lots of wildlife during the day.

20150928-DSC_2485Our most exciting leopard story starts when Philip or Everest spied a female leopard heading toward a stand of trees and rocks.  20150928-DSC_2501We stopped to watch, and then decided that she probably was going to move through to the other side, so we moved the vehicle to be able to see her if that is what she did. Sure enough, she shortly showed up there, heading out into a field on a path that paralleled the track the truck was on. 20150928-DSC_2552We saw that she had brought a friend (male, we think). 20150928-DSC_2561The two of them walked through the tall grass, moving unhurriedly, and we did our best to keep them in sight. Eventually, they decided they wanted to cross the road, and indeed on they came. They passed in front of our truck no more than 10 feet away. Great for pictures. 20150928-DSC_2574 20150928-DSC_2576

They continued on toward another rock 20150928-DSC_2595outcropping, 20150928-DSC_2604and once they got there, we thought we saw the female kill a small field animal that didn’t move quickly enough. I guess that was their goal, as we lost sight of them and shortly thereafter, we moved on.

As had become usual, we saw a number of the larger land animals.

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Impala

Impala

We also saw a number of birds.

Vulture, Cape (juv)

Vulture, Cape (juv)

Stork, Yellow-billed; Goose, Egyptian; Stilt, Black-winged; Plover, Blacksmith

Stork, Yellow-billed; Goose, Egyptian; Stilt, Black-winged; Plover, Blacksmith

Stilt, Black-winged

Stilt, Black-winged

Weavers' nests

Weavers’ nests

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Vulture, Lappet-faced

Vulture, Lappet-faced

We saw other leopards today, 20150928-DSC_2810both of the two we saw were up a tree, (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) which we watched for awhile.  The leopards were watching the animals in a large field beyond the tree each was in. We tried to see what each was seeing, but didn’t see anything that would excite them to do something dramatic. It was fun to watch for awhile, and then we moved on.  Can you see the one in the tree below?

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As for lions, we saw probably 30 all told. All were resting, and we saw only walking type movement from any of them. 20150928-DSC_2853 20150928-DSC_2898In one area were two females sitting under a tree, while across the path at the next tree, two males were lazing away their late morning. We watched the males for awhile, and then moved on. 20150928-DSC_3098 20150928-DSC_3113 20150928-DSC_3133The last sighting was the largest, Seven youngsters (less than a year) were sleeping under a tree under the oversight of two older females. Eventually, the two older ones and five of the youngsters cross and joined two more females and two more youngsters under a much larger tree. We watched them for awhile, then moved on.

We saw some more hippos sleeping in a pond, and quite a few birds. We saw eland, kongoni, dik-dik’s, and at least one other new-to-us antelopes, water bucks. It was quite a day.

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Kongoni

Heron, Great Blue

Heron, Great Blue

Weaver, White-headed Buffalo

Weaver, White-headed Buffalo

Hyrax trying to mooch some food from us humans

Hyrax trying to mooch some food from us humans

Shrike, Northern White-Crowned

Shrike, Northern White-Crowned

Dwarf Mongoose standing watch in an abandoned termite mound

Dwarf Mongoose standing watch in an abandoned termite mound

Vervet Monkey

Vervet Monkey

Water Bucks

Water Bucks

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Dik-diks

Topi compared to zebra

Topi compared to zebra

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Fabulous Trip to Africa, 22 Sep to 4 Oct 2015, Post 5 – Olduvai Gorge to Serengeti

Today, it’s the cradle of mankind! Oh, what a day. Another long and hard one, based around riding in the van all day.  We started out in the morning early (as usual) and got the benefit of seeing the sun through the clouds again.  We drove by the entrance road to the Ngorongoro valley and onto the next one.

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This one afforded us views of clouds still clinging to the surrounding hills, as well as views of the tribal huts that housed people in that area.

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We were able to get out of Ngorongoro fairly easily, making our way to the Olduvai Gorge at the connection of the Ngorongoro and Serengeti Plain. The museum is right on the edge of the gorge, and does a good job describing the finds, and helping me remember the dates and sequence. It tells of Louis Leakey’s first experience at Oldupai Gorge in 1924, when he and a group of others were looking for dinosaur bones. He came back at the head of his own expedition in 1931. “Olduvai” was apparently a misspelling that stuck for Leakey’s publication, but locally it is known with a p instead of a v.

Looking down from Olduvai Gorge Museum

Looking down from Olduvai Gorge Museum

In 1934, he was joined by Mary, his eventual wife, as a student, along with others. Each year they came back and dug for bones, using the latest in archeological techniques. Finally in 1959, they discovered Zinjantropus, the first of several historic finds. Zinj, later renamed with a more scientific name was in the bottom most of four beds, and was determined to be 1.9 million years old. The lava base of the gorge is 2 million years old. Later came Homo Habilus (Handy Man) at 1.8 million years old, and Homo Erectus (stand-up man) at 1.6 million years old.  Mary and another colleague later (in the 1960’s?) found the footprints which had been frozen in time thought to be the prints of Austropithicus Ferensis (Lucy, found in Ethiopia, and thought to be 3.5 million years old. These footprints were found frozen in time several kilometers from the main gorge site.

After a brief lecture, one of the guides took us down into the gorge and showed us the site from its floor, and the marker which shows where Zinj was found.

Looking back toward the Museum

Looking back toward the Museum

We dropped him off, and made tracks for the Serengeti park.

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Starling, Superb

Starling, Superb

Weaver, Thick-billed

Weaver, Thick-billed

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20150927-DSC_2079At the gate to the park, we stopped and ate our lunch, provided by the last hotel, the Serena.  In this park, we were visited by a number of animals, most notably four elephants, who kindly allowed us to take their pictures.  We also saw quite a few birds, including many of the starlings that are more common in the Serengeti.  Oh, and a gecko that was pink and blue!The lunch was (as might be expected) too much food, but Philip took all the extra and made up packages for giving away to those who didn’t have any.

We continued on, but the road was the usual washboard, and it was noisy and bouncy. 20150927-DSC_2059We passed another native village, as we drove.  Finally a couple of hours later, we turned off into the game reserve (off the main road), and made our way to a number of spots where Philip and Everest thought we would see something. 20150927-DSC_2062 20150927-DSC_2079

Barbet, d'Arnaud's

Barbet, d’Arnaud’s

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Female Ostrich; the first willing to have its picture taken!

20150928-DSC_2825We saw the usual suspects, zebra, giraffes, grant’s gazelles as well as a new kind of antelope, the Reedbuck. It is larger than the gazelles we have been seeing, and has two stubbier horns on its head.

We saw a lion, sitting by itself (we presume), as well as a pod of hippopotamuses in the river we were roughly following.20150927-DSC_2301

Shrike, Grey-backed

Shrike, Grey-backed

Before we got to the pod, we saw an individual who walked along from one pond to another, and then dropped itself into the new pond to rest from its exertions.

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Roller, Lilac-breasted

Roller, Lilac-breasted

Stork, Yellow-billed; Goose, Egyptian; Heron, Grey

Stork, Yellow-billed; Goose, Egyptian; Heron, Grey

Teal, Red-billed; Plover, Blacksmith; Stork, Yellow-billed; Goose, Egyptian; Heron, Grey

Teal, Red-billed; Plover, Blacksmith; Stork, Yellow-billed; Goose, Egyptian; Heron, Grey

Heron, Grey

Heron, Grey

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Kongoni

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Grant’s Gazelle

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Cape buffalo

The trip into the camp was long after that (another half an hour), and the most difficult part was it started raining! We have made it here, however, so we now are happily ensconced in our tent-mansions. This is the largest room we’ve been in on this trip, and it is all out of canvas. Hopefully the rain will subside so we can go out tomorrow and enjoy the sights of the Serengeti!

Saddle-billed stork watched with great interest

Saddle-billed stork watched with great interest

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