Tag Archives: Hyena

Fabulous Trip to Africa, 22 Sep to 4 Oct 2015, Post 10 – Masai Mara

20151002-DSC_4528Today was another early start: 6:00 wake-up call and 6:30 take-off. We got to see the hot air balloons taking off as we ourselves took off.

We headed out to see what we could find, and it turned out to be birds, topi, Impala, and elands, along with some banded mongooses before breakfast.

Topi

Topi

Spurfowl, Red-necked

Spurfowl, Red-necked

Longclaw, Yellow-throated

Longclaw, Yellow-throated

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Bateleur

Bateleur

After breakfast, we saw two lions, a mom and her 3-year-old daughter with a warthog’s’ head in her mouth.  Further along, there was another lion who went to investigate some noise in a gully, and a cape buffalo came up to meet her challenge!

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A thrush?

Heron, Black-headed

Heron, Black-headed

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A lion looking down in the gully just beyond

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A cape buffalo coming up from the gully to “play” with the lion, who had beat a hasty retreat

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Daughter lion with lunch

In addition, we saw the usual variety of antelope, zebras, a crocodile and warthogs.

The sky took on an interesting feature, as a halo of light surrounded the sun.  There were clouds in the sky, and knowing how dry the season had been, we asked about the likelihood of rain.  We were told that the halo was usually seen before rain showers, and sure enough later on in the day, it did rain for a short while.

The highlight of the antelopes we saw were three male eland, which could be easily differentiated from the females by the large dewlap they had hanging below their broad necks.

Male Eland

Male Eland

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A very pregnant hyena

A very pregnant hyena

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A cheetah resting

This afternoon we’ll visit a Masai village hopefully!

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And it was quite a visit. The headman in the village introduced himself to us, and then presented the Masai men, who did their chant with bass and harmony (no instruments, mind, just with their voices), and to these chants, they jumped — who jumps the highest? This went on for quite awhile, and then they approached us and we all participated in the chant and structured walk.

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Next he took us into the village proper. This is a rough circle with about seven houses in it. There is a twig fence around the whole thing, with four openings, one for each main family in the village. When their cattle are driven into the center of the compound for the night, they know to come in the correct entrance. The houses themselves are made out of sticks and cow dung daub, mainly because the cow dung does not get infested by pests.

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The next was a demonstration of making fire. The men gathered a flat stick about 1.5 inches thick and a round stick about a foot long and half an inch in diameter. One of the men then put his long knife on the ground, flat, placed the flat stick on top of it, and then used the round stick to spin back and forth creating friction. Meanwhile another man pulled some elephant dung from the roof of the house next to him, and pulled it apart, exposing the undigested dry straw. The heat from the friction and the softness of the wood began depositing smoldering ash on the knife below, and when the man spinning the stick decided that he had enough burning material, the generating sticks were removed, and the embers were put into the elephant dung. With a little blowing encouragement, the fire indeed flamed up, and if it had been wanted for broader purpose, it would have been put under larger wood shavings. From what they said, the bush people taught this to the Masai.

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We went into a house, designed and built by the women. There is an entrance room, followed by the main room where the fire for the cooking burns. This has benches on two sides, and a vent hole high on the wall behind the fire. The houses are dark (no windows), and the roof is flat, with cow dung on top.

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We came out and the village women gave us their version of chants and songs. They also were unaccompanied by instruments. The women didn’t jump, however — that’s just for the men (and boys).

We were lastly led outside of the village proper where there were the women had laid out their wares for us to peruse and purchase if we wanted to. We all picked out something to buy, and bargained our way to the deal.

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It was back to the camp, and this evening Nixon (whose village this is) is going to talk to us about the Masai some more.

Nixon’s talk went into more detail about the Masai culture. They believe that God (undefined) dropped the first human on earth in the Northern Africa area of the Nile River, closer to the source than the delta. He is named, and his wife is named, as are their three sons. Their three sons each started a clan, and the rule became no one could marry within their clan. There are now thousands of clans, and the rule still holds. Marriages are arranged between the parents of the man and prospective wife, based in part on the dowry (in terms of number of cows) on offer.

Their diet consists primarily of the blood, milk and meat of the livestock (cows originally, and now including sheep and goats). Masai are nomadic, in part to provide feed for their livestock, and to account for the weather. Nixon said that the warrior who has two wives will leave his primary wife at the first location, and take his second one with him to the second encampment, to build the house and keep him in the way he has been accustomed. Apparently his village is planning a seasonal move within the next couple of months as the grass is getting too dry to support their herds.

He also talked about the changes that have come about to the nomadic aspect due to the need to have their children in schools. Providing education requires a more stable community, and so that has slowed down the movements of the tribes. He talked for a good 30 minutes, and covered a number of topics. Then it was on to dinner and back to the rooms to pack for tomorrow’s trip to Nairobi.

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Fabulous Trip to Africa, 22 Sep to 4 Oct 2015, Post 6 – Serengeti

Out into the cold and dark…   Breakfast was early as predicted. We finally got on the road at 7:30, and made our way out to where the game were. That’s a bit of a bad way of saying it, as game are all around us here. We pass through zebra, giraffe, and several kinds of antelope before we get very far.

But first I should comment on our lodgings. This is a tent place. All the buildings, of which there are about 15 are tents. 20150928-DSC_2403The main tent is about twice as large as the cabin tents, giving it room for a nice lounge on one side and dining tables on the other. There are chandeliers hanging from the ceiling providing light, and electricity for most of your needs. This is provided by sun power, which collects the electricity in batteries during the day, and then allows use at night. There is a generator which kicks in if the batteries get low. As with each of these individual-tent-cabin places in the middle of wild animals, one of the camp’s employees (ours is Sampson) accompanies you whenever you go out in the dark.  By the way, the curtain behind Gwen hides the bathroom facilities, so we didn’t have to go outside to relieve ourselves.

Our room cabin tent is very large, probably 40 feet by 24 feet, with a full stand-up bathroom at one end. The room centers around the double bed, enshrouded with netting to keep away the mosquitoes at night. The other aspect of living in a tent in the Serengeti are the noises in the night. Lots of animals sound off (we really couldn’t tell what we were listening to), and then there is the wind, which was loud last night.

So on to today. Each day seems to get better, and today was no exception.

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Vervet monkeys

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Zebra fight!

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Momma and baby Kongoni

Momma and baby Kongoni

Momma and baby

Momma and baby

The savannah in the Serengeti seems dryer than what we saw in Amboseli or in Ngorongoro.  I guess there is enough to eat, but our guide tells us that the rains have been sparse so far, so the fields are not as supportive of the large herds are they have been in the past.  Still we see lots of wildlife during the day.

20150928-DSC_2485Our most exciting leopard story starts when Philip or Everest spied a female leopard heading toward a stand of trees and rocks.  20150928-DSC_2501We stopped to watch, and then decided that she probably was going to move through to the other side, so we moved the vehicle to be able to see her if that is what she did. Sure enough, she shortly showed up there, heading out into a field on a path that paralleled the track the truck was on. 20150928-DSC_2552We saw that she had brought a friend (male, we think). 20150928-DSC_2561The two of them walked through the tall grass, moving unhurriedly, and we did our best to keep them in sight. Eventually, they decided they wanted to cross the road, and indeed on they came. They passed in front of our truck no more than 10 feet away. Great for pictures. 20150928-DSC_2574 20150928-DSC_2576

They continued on toward another rock 20150928-DSC_2595outcropping, 20150928-DSC_2604and once they got there, we thought we saw the female kill a small field animal that didn’t move quickly enough. I guess that was their goal, as we lost sight of them and shortly thereafter, we moved on.

As had become usual, we saw a number of the larger land animals.

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Impala

Impala

We also saw a number of birds.

Vulture, Cape (juv)

Vulture, Cape (juv)

Stork, Yellow-billed; Goose, Egyptian; Stilt, Black-winged; Plover, Blacksmith

Stork, Yellow-billed; Goose, Egyptian; Stilt, Black-winged; Plover, Blacksmith

Stilt, Black-winged

Stilt, Black-winged

Weavers' nests

Weavers’ nests

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Vulture, Lappet-faced

Vulture, Lappet-faced

We saw other leopards today, 20150928-DSC_2810both of the two we saw were up a tree, (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) which we watched for awhile.  The leopards were watching the animals in a large field beyond the tree each was in. We tried to see what each was seeing, but didn’t see anything that would excite them to do something dramatic. It was fun to watch for awhile, and then we moved on.  Can you see the one in the tree below?

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As for lions, we saw probably 30 all told. All were resting, and we saw only walking type movement from any of them. 20150928-DSC_2853 20150928-DSC_2898In one area were two females sitting under a tree, while across the path at the next tree, two males were lazing away their late morning. We watched the males for awhile, and then moved on. 20150928-DSC_3098 20150928-DSC_3113 20150928-DSC_3133The last sighting was the largest, Seven youngsters (less than a year) were sleeping under a tree under the oversight of two older females. Eventually, the two older ones and five of the youngsters cross and joined two more females and two more youngsters under a much larger tree. We watched them for awhile, then moved on.

We saw some more hippos sleeping in a pond, and quite a few birds. We saw eland, kongoni, dik-dik’s, and at least one other new-to-us antelopes, water bucks. It was quite a day.

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Kongoni

Heron, Great Blue

Heron, Great Blue

Weaver, White-headed Buffalo

Weaver, White-headed Buffalo

Hyrax trying to mooch some food from us humans

Hyrax trying to mooch some food from us humans

Shrike, Northern White-Crowned

Shrike, Northern White-Crowned

Dwarf Mongoose standing watch in an abandoned termite mound

Dwarf Mongoose standing watch in an abandoned termite mound

Vervet Monkey

Vervet Monkey

Water Bucks

Water Bucks

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Dik-diks

Topi compared to zebra

Topi compared to zebra

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Fabulous Trip to Africa, 22 Sep to 4 Oct 2015, Post 4 – Ngorongoro Conservation Area

Today is spent all in the caldera. As most all our days, this one starts early, with breakfast at 6:00 and on our way at 6:30.  Morning light breaking through the clouds that seem to hover around the volcano early was fascinating to see from our vehicle as it headed down the steep road from the lip to the floor.  The reflection of the light in the infrequent water helped us see what was below.

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We spent about seven hours in the caldera, and it was fun almost from the get-go. The first of the highlights were the black rhinos, one of which we saw almost right off, and then later on we saw two more. All were at a distance, but hopefully the camera was up to recording them. We later learned that these black rhinos are extremely rare, there being approximately 25 left in the wild.  So seeing 3 of the 25 was even more of a treasure than we realized at the time.

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There are four lions sleeping in this stone formation.

The second was a pride of lions all sleeping in and amongst some rocks on the side of a rise toward the middle of the caldera. Down below them we noticed a number of hyena, and a jackal or two.

Oh, no you don;t!

Oh, no you don’t!

Three of the hyena, sometimes joined by a fourth had a piece of a kill about 100 yards below them, and were busily taking hunks out of it. 20150926-DSC_1422One of the jackals tried several times to get a few bites, but was chased off by one of the hyenas each time. It was only as we climbed the rise behind the lions that we were able to see there were a number of hyena congregated in a depression below the ground level a bit farther away from the lions. We surmised that they were devouring what was left of a carcass that the lions had brought down and had sated themselves with last night. 20150926-DSC_1351There was a hyena that we had first noticed on our left as we were driving toward the area where we first saw the lions. He (or she) crossed our path between where we first stopped and where the lions slept and headed for the depression, but eventually stopped, watched what was going on for awhile, and after the appearance of a couple of other hyenas, decided that discretion was the better part of valor and came back across the road where he watched what was going on. We only really understood his actions after we spotted the hyena group as we drove above it. One of Gwen’s favorite aspects of the day was hearing the hyenas “talking” to each other during this episode.

We saw quite a variety of wildlife, most of which we had seen before, but I can never get enough of them, especially the birds.

Crane, Grey-Crowned

Crane, Grey-Crowned

Crane, Grey-Crowned

Crane, Grey-Crowned

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Crake, Black

Crake, Black

Pelican, Great White

Pelican, Great White

Ibis, Sacred

Ibis, Sacred

Bustard, Kori

Bustard, Kori

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Eagle, Tawny or Eagle, Wahlberg's

Eagle, Tawny or Eagle, Wahlberg’s

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We managed to get very close to some warthogs as we drove along.

20150926-DSC_1534 20150926-DSC_1678One of the more amazing sights were the herds of wildebeest stretching out to the horizon, or coming over the hill toward us at a distance.

A wildebeest herd and flock of birds in the Ngorongoro caldera

A wildebeest herd off in the distance

The third amazing find were a family group of elephants we passed as we came onto the rise where the road started to climb out of the caldera. This rise is hilly, with a number of trees of various kinds forming a loosely packed forest, enabling easy movement by the elephants as well as shelter from the sun when desired (like it was as it was well after noon by this time). 20150926-DSC_1887At first, we saw three females and two youngsters (one very young, a second perhaps a juvenile) eating grass and leaves from a tree not too far off the road. As we watched, the five became seven, as there was another youngster behind the tree-eater, and another older juvenile with the first youngster. 20150926-DSC_1875 20150926-DSC_1858There were about a dozen zebra on the other side of the vehicle happily munching away at the shorter grass shaded by the trees as well. As we continued on, the road took a turn which took us in front of the elephants, and we discovered the rest of the group, with at least three more adult females, a couple more juveniles and yet another youngster. 20150926-DSC_1895We watched them continue to eat, and some decided we were too close, so they headed away from us while two or three headed to an area we couldn’t see ahead of us. 20150926-DSC_1924 20150926-DSC_1923We eventually moved in that direction, and found a stream where four elephants, including one youngster and at least one juvenile were enjoying playing with the water. The baby was having the most fun, kicking up water with his feet and trunk, while the others were enjoying spraying themselves with the water, and doing their own dance to keep their feet cool. It was delightful to watch, and was a really nice way to end our tour of the area.

This afternoon we have another talk by Philip. He talked about Kenya and Tanzania, and the relative size and populations of them. In response to questions, he focused more on the education systems in the two countries and how they have evolved.

Tomorrow it is on to Oldivai Gorge (rather the museum the Leakeys created near there) to hear about the finds there, and then the afternoon is a tour which should end us in the Serengeti.

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