Fabulous Trip to Africa, 22 Sep to 4 Oct 2015, Post 11 – Masai Mara to Nairobi

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Back to Nairobi by airplane today. But we had time for one last short safari in the morning to try once again to find the male lions. We were out at 6:30 am, and bouncing along the back trail from our camp. Sammy, the driver, worked with Philip. 20151003-DSC_4952The first good thing: the sunrise, and the six balloons aloft to catch the morning light. Beautiful!

After that, we saw some birds (storks, vultures, ground birds), but no lions. Then, off in the distance, Philip spied what we were looking for. We were across the river from the two male lions, so Sammy accelerated, and we were headed swiftly toward the fording point. We made it across, and headed back to where we had seen the two lions.

20151003-DSC_4968 20151003-DSC_4963The two were coming to greet each other. They are according to Philip, brothers, and so didn’t fight each other. Instead they keep mostly to their own side of the territorial markers.

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We got some great shots of both the males, and it was really exciting to hear them roar their greetings to each other.  At one point they were roaring at a female lion up on the far ridge from us probably 500 yards away.  20151003-DSC_5034 20151003-DSC_5049The female roared back, but kept on walking away.  Philip believed she had mated already this cycle, and was not interested in more of the same.

We stayed near them for awhile, but then decided to see if we could catch another cheetah that had been sighted in the same area yesterday.

20151003-DSC_5126We never found the cheetah, but found two more male lions, this time on the other bank of the river. We watched them as long as we could (they were walking parallel to the river). After awhile, the one in front stopped, and the other caught up. These two are also brothers, all four Philip tells us are from the same father. When the second brother caught the first in this second pair, they started playing just like youngsters, rolling over and nuzzling each other. 20151003-DSC_5206We soon left them, and what do you know, we found yet another male lion. He was hidden in some bushes, so we didn’t stay with him long. Oh, what fun to find so many lions — it made for a great end to the safaris.

Stork, Marabou

Stork, Marabou

Stork, Marabou

Stork, Marabou

Stork, Yellow-billed

Stork, Yellow-billed

Sand Grouse, Yellow-throated

Sand Grouse, Yellow-throated

Guinea Fowl, Helmeted

Guinea Fowl, Helmeted

Stork, Marabou

Stork, Marabou

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Plover, African Wattled (Lapwing)

Plover, African Wattled (Lapwing)

Along the way, we saw more birds and other animals just as we’d seen on almost all our expeditions.  So, after returning to the camp, we ate breakfast, finished packing, checked out and headed for the airport.

The plane, this time a twin-engine plane was almost full, but it flew at 15,000 feet (as opposed to the 8500 feet that the single engine plane that got us to the camp flew at), and while I’d like to say it was smoother, I really can’t. Thank goodness we were all seasoned travelers, as it was a rough ride. One woman behind Bruce and Dee gave up her breakfast before we landed.20151003-DSC_5260 20151003-DSC_5293

Nairobi’s Wilson Airport (not the large international one) where we landed put us all through a security check before they let us out of the area, including a belt for our bags and a walk-through scan, but I was less than impressed with their practices. The buzzer went off when I went through, but no one noticed, so I just kept on walking.

Charles, our driver from the last time we were here met us outside the terminal, and off we went to lunch. Lunch was at the “Carnivore” restaurant, a very up-market place. Their way of working is to bring soup and then to put hot plates in front of you. They then come around with skewers of hot meats of many varieties for you to sample. You keep getting offered more meat until you take the little flag down from the center of your table. The food was not particularly tasty, but the variety made up for it.

Then, it was to the Eka Hotel where we had stayed the first night we were in Nairobi at the start of our adventure. Unfortunately, we didn’t make it easily. We got within a mile or so, and the van broke down in the middle of a very busy dirt road. 20151003-DSC_5310Trucks (large ones, with 40 foot containers on their beds were many, as were trucks that I connected with the construction activities along the road. It took about an hour for someone to come rescue us, and now we are happily put up in our rooms.

Tomorrow, the elephant and giraffe hospital, and eventually the flight home!!!

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